Mobility and arthritis

Walking can be the last thing on your mind when you wake up with joints which are stiff, swollen and painful. However, walking is one of the most important things you can do to help relieve the pain from arthritis as well as improve your overall health. Walking is a low-impact exercise meaning there is less stress on the joints than in more rigorous exercise.

Why is walking good for you?

  • It helps you maintain a healthy body weight, any extra weight which your joints have to hold will increase the symptoms from arthritis.
  • Walking improves blood flow to the cartilage, helping the cartilage to perform its role of protecting the end of the bones in your joints.
  • Movement helps to lubricate the joints helping to increase range of movement.
  • Walking increases muscles strength, the stronger the muscles are the more they can do to support and protect the joints, helping to reduce stiffness and pain.

What walking aids may be suitable for me?

There are many walking aids available on the market from walking sticks to 4 wheeled walkers. Click here to read 'A quick guide to walking aids' for further information.

For individuals with arthritis, there are specific aids out there which can help provide some additional grip and support for those who have weakness and pain in their hands.

A walking stick with a full palm support can help to reduce the severity of the grip on the walking stick, as well as help to spread the weight and pressure throughout the whole hand.  Click here to view our arthritis full palm support cane.  

A 4 wheeled walker with forearm supports allows you to bear weight through your forearms rather than your hands. Spreading weight through larger parts of your body will help to reduce pressure on the smaller joints in your hands, helping to reduce pain and discomfort when walking. Click here to view our forearm walker. 

It is advisable that you contact your GP for a Community Physiotherapy referral. A Physiotherapist will be able to assess what mobility aid is most suitable for you.

 

References:
https://creakyjoints.org/diet-exercise/walking-with-arthritis/
https://www.arthritis.org/health-wellness/healthy-living/physical-activity/walking/building-a-walking-workout

arthritis ask the ot

Leave a comment

All comments are moderated before being published